Core Connection
  Feb. 2013 - April 2013


www.cancer.uci.edu/shared_resources.asp
 In This Issue 


Shared Resources
  Biobehavioral
  Biostatistics
  Experimental Tissue Resource
  Genomics High-Throughput
  In-Vivo Onco-Imaging
  Optical Biology Core
  Transgenic Mouse Facility 
  
Other Items
  Contact Us
  Did You Know?
  Don't Forget
  Funding Opportunities
  Social Networking Tools
  You are Invited...

Research Programs
Our research efforts are organized in four research programs, which serve to foster interactions and collaborations within specific themes. Cancer center members are usually affiliated with one program but work with collaborators from different programs in multi-disciplinary groups.

The Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center's four research programs are:

  Cancer Prevention & Prognosis (CPP)
  Chemical & Structural Biology (CSB)
  Onco-Imaging & Biotechnology (OIB)
  Systems, Pathways & Targets (SPT)
  Associate Members (AS)

  Don't Forget

Employee Bulletin
Continuing funding to maintain support for cancer center cores (and keep prices low) depends critically on papers published that use our faciltiies. As NIH transitions to digital, it becomes critically important that you list the support of the center in all publications that are appropriate. Since credit will come from electronically scanned papers and cannot be attributed later, it is essential that you CITE THE CANCER CENTER SUPPORT GRANT (CCSG) if your publication is cancer-related: "Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P30CA062203. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.”

 Countdown to the Progress Report

Calendar


until the cancer center's progress report is due, November 27, 2013.
 Did You Know?  

?
The Cancer Center Support Grant will fund $269,393 in support to the cancer center's seven cores during the 2013-2014 budget cycle.

 You are Invited...  

Invitation

Women’s DOT Meeting
July 26, 11:30 a.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 23, Room 402

Skin DOT Meeting
July 22, 1 p.m.
UC Irvine Campus
BLI Library

Colon DOT Meeting
July 23, 5 p.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 22A, Room 2103/2104

Prostate DOT Meeting
July 24, 3 p.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 23, Room 402

Shared Resources Directors Meeting
Closed Meeting
Aug. 27, 3 p.m.
UC Irvine Campus
Sprague Hall 105

Prostate DOT Meeting
Sept. 18, 3 p.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 3, Room 101

Women’s DOT Meeting
Sept. 20, 11:30 a.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Douglas Hospital, Room 4843

Skin DOT Meeting
Sept. 23, 1 p.m.
UC Irvine Campus
BLI Library

Colon DOT Meeting
Sept. 24, 5 p.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 22A, Room 2103/2104

Women’s DOT Meeting
Oct. 18, 11:30 a.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 55, Room 212

Colon DOT Meeting
Oct. 22, 5 p.m.
UC Irvine Medical Center
Building 3, Room 101

Chao Lectureship (Public)
Oct. 22
5 p.m. Reception
6 p.m. Lecture
Beckman Center, UC Irvine Campus
"Understanding Performance: Can Exercise Mimetics Replace Exercise?"

Chao Lectureship (Scientific)
Oct. 23, Noon
Tamkin Lecture Hall (F-110)
UC Irvine Campus
"Nuclear Receptors and the Hunger Games: from Feast to Famine"

 Funding Opportunities  


$

Internal Funding Opportunities

Please contact:
Jacqueline Tidball
Associate Director, CCSG Administration
tidball@uci.edu

External Funding Opportunities


The cancer center’s extramural awards analyst provides services that include researching federal and private funding opportunities and discovering project-specific funding sources, in addition to timely editorial and proposal writing support.

Please contact:
Alisz Demecs
Extramural Awards Analyst
ademecs@uci.edu

 Social Networking Tools  

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Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter!

 Contact Us  

Email
The Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center supports seven shared resources that provide services essential to basic and translational research. Each of these is available to researchers at UC Irvine and other institutions. Investigators do not have to be cancer center members to use the facilities. Each shared resource is partially funded by user fees and other support. To learn more about the services offered and how they might benefit your research, please refer to the specific contact information listed under the shared resource section of this newsletter or contact:

Jacqueline Tidball
Associate Director, CCSG Administration
tidball@uci.edu

Jennifer Ivask
Community Engagement Manager
jivask@uci.edu



 Biobehavioral Shared Resource Facility (BBSR)

Wenzel Director: Lari Wenzel, PhD
Phone:
949-824-3926
Manager:
Susie Hsieh, PhD
Phone:
949-824-3384

Location:
UC Irvine, 212 Sprague Hall, Irvine, CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/biobehavioral.asp

The primary activities of the BBSR include consultation on behavioral and/or quality-of-life self-report measurement, research design, data collection, interpretation of self-report data, manuscript preparation and counseling interventions within clinical trials. The BBSR has participated in translational research in psychoneuroimmunology, examination of behavioral issues that enhance recruitment and compliance within cancer center clinical trials and development of behavioral and quality-of-life outcomes associated with clinical trials. The aim of the BBSR is to support cancer researchers by providing them with the necessary expertise and assistance to incorporate patient/participant-reported outcomes (PROs), health-related quality-of-life (QOL) and counseling interventions within clinical trials into their research.

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Quarterly Highlights
A new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) grant submitted last quarter is now funded!

Title: "Ovarian Cancer Patient-Centered Decision Aid"
PI: Lari Wenzel

Because the diagnosis of ovarian cancer typically occurs at an advanced stage, ovarian cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic cancers. In addition, effective treatment and disease management is extremely challenging. Clinical trials show that intraperitoneal (IP) therapy is most effective but has potentially more complications, while traditional intravenous (IV) therapy has a more moderate side effect profile- thereby optimizing quality of life during treatment. This newly funded proposal addresses how women make the decision in choosing traditional IV or IP therapy with its potential for considerable down time, complications and reduced quality of life during treatment, but better chances of survival.

Collaborators on this PCORI project include cancer center member Dr. Robert Bristow (CPP). Dr. Bristow will have a role as a clinician stakeholder and will take the lead in recruiting patients from the UC Irvine Medical Center Division of Gynecology Oncology for the piloting of the decision-making tool. Dr. Dana Mukamel from the Health Policy Research Institute will also be a major participant, and her role as a co-investigator will utilize her expertise in health economics and decision making.



 Biostatistics Shared Resource Facility (BSR)

Gillen Director: Daniel L. Gillen, PhD
Phone: 949-824-9862
Facility Manager: Michael J. Phelan, PhD
Phone: 949-824-9637

Location:
101 The City Drive South, Bldg. 56, Rm. 228, Orange, CA 92868

www.cancer.uci.edu/biostatistics/index.asp

The mission of the Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR) faculty and staff is to support the conception, design, implementation, analysis and reporting of research conducted by members of the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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Quarterly Highlights
Activities include statistical consultation in study design, data management, sample size calculation, data analysis, data interpretation, and preparation of reports, abstracts, manuscripts and grant proposals. Three new publications were achieved this past quarter:

Cancer Prevention & Prognosis Program:
Armstrong WB, Taylor TH, Kennedy AR, Melrose RJ, Messadi DV, Gu M, Le AD, Perloff M, Civantos F, Goodwin WJ, Wirth LJ, Kerr AR, Meyskens FL, Jr. Bowman birk inhibitor concentrate and oral leukoplakia: a randomized Phase 2b trial. Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 2013; 6:410-418. PMID: 23639862.

Onco-Imaging & Biotechnology:
O'Sullivan TD, Leproux A, Chen JH, Bahri S, Matlock A, Roblyer D, McLaren CE, Chen WP, Cerussi AE, Su MY, Tromberg BJ. Optical imaging correlates with magnetic resonance imaging breast density and reveals composition changes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Breast Cancer Res 2013; 15:R14. PMID: 23433249.

Systems, Pathways & Targets:
Lusch A, Abdelshehid C, Hidas G, Okhunov Z, Osann KE, McDougall EM, Landman J (SPT). In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Optics and Performance of a Distal Sensor Ureteroscope (Storz Flex-XC) vs. a Standard Fiberoptic Ureteroscope (Storz Flex-X2). Journal of Endourology / Endourological Society 2013. PMID: 23402369.

Also notable was that Kathryn Osann (AS) was invited, along with Susie Hsieh, Ed Nelson (OIB), and Lari Wenzel (CPP), to present their abstract, "Predictors of Persistent Emotional Distress in Long-Term Cervical Cancer Survivors," to the American Psychosocial Oncology Society in Huntington Beach Feb. 15-16, 2013.



 Experimental Tissue
Shared Resource Facility (ETR)

EdwardsDirector: Robert Edwards, MD, PhD
Phone: 949-824-8576
Facility Manager: Kehui Wang
Phone: 949-824-8974

Location: UC Irvine, Medical Science Building I, D-440, Irvine, CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/experimental_tissue.asp


The primary objective of the Experimental Tissue Shared Resource (ETR) is to provide basic, translational and clinical cancer center researchers access to, and analysis of human and animal tissues.

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Quarterly Highlights


Rules governing human subjects research on de-identified specimens are constantly evolving. Use of any tissue from our banks in this manner no longer requires explicit IRB approval. Questions about the process should be directed to Dr. Robert Edwards. To obtain de-identified specimens, investigators must file a Request for Determination of Non-human Subject Research form with the IRB.


Learn More

 Genomics High-Throughput Facility (GHTF) 

Sandmeyer Director: Suzanne Sandmeyer, PhD
Phone: 949-824-7571
Facility Manager: Melanie Oakes, PhD
Phone: 949-824-6023
Bioinformatics Director: Chad Garner, PhD
Phone: 949-824-2036

Location: UC Irvine, 340 Sprague Hall, Irvine CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/genomic.asp

The mission of the UC Irvine Genomics High-Throughput Facility (GHTF) is to provide genome-wide analysis for clients interested in gene expression, regulation of gene expression, and genome sequence and variation. The primary forms of genome-wide analysis are the Affymetrix GeneChip, Illumina HiSeq 2500 next-generation sequencing and PacBio RS real-time single molecule sequencing.

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Quarterly Highlights
The GHTF's newest technology acquisition is the PacBio RS system. The core has now validated its protocols, and usage is starting to grow. The GHTF is currently working on a project with cancer center member, Kevin Thornton, PhD (SPT). GHTF will add PacBio service information to the GHTF website and they anticipate continued growth as this technology advances and as the number of applications increase. This quarter, the GHTF also worked with the Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics (IGB) to organize an application for a shared instrumentation grant to NIH requesting support for purchase of a Fluidigm Integrated Microfluidics system that would bring another new technology to the UC Irvine campus. The Fluidigm system includes the first automated single cell capture technology that includes processing to study targeted gene expression or perform transcriptome analysis. Another system, the microfluidic system, has components for library construction for targeted resequencing projects and a real-time PCR instrument that is capable of digital real-time PCR. The Bioinformatics team has been busy assisting Dr. Leonard Sender (CPP) in developing a model for studying the genomics of pediatric cancers that can eventually be implemented for adult cancers within the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Learn More

 In-Vivo Functional Onco-Imaging (IVFOI) 

GulsenDirector: Gultekin Gulsen, PhD
Phone:
949-824-6001
Facility Manager:
Yuting Lin
Phone:
949-824-6001

Location:
UC Irvine, 164 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/in_vivo.asp


The long-term goal of the In-Vivo Functional Onco-Imaging (IVFOI) core is to promote the application of imaging techniques in cancer research. Toward this aim, the development and application of imaging technologies are key research areas. The current imaging facilities at the center include: a 15-cm bore 7-Tesla MR system (small animals), a 94-cm bore 4-Tesla MR system (human/small animals), a 57-cm bore 3-Tesla MR system (humans), a combine MR-Diffuse Optical Tomography (MR-DOT) system (small animals), and a whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) system (humans). All combined multimodality systems were developed in-house.

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Quarterly Highlights

ORThe IVFOI has now established a strong collaboration with Philip Low, PhD, of Purdue University, on optical molecular probes that selectively target ovarian and prostate cancer. An exciting possibility that will make UC Irvine one of the three institutions in the nation that will conduct a Phase 2 clinical trial of the optical fluorescent ovarian targeting probe developed by Low. Supported by our industrial collaborators at On Target Laboratories, this clinical trial will evaluate the specificity of this targeted fluorescent probe in conjunction with an intraoperative fluorescent camera. The IVFOI core also helped to establish a collaboration with On Target Laboratories and Dr. Leslie Randall (SPT) this past quarter. The IVFOI core is in the midst of assisting Dr. Randall with the preparation of an IRB protocol and an IND application for this ovarian cancer targeting agent. The overall goal of this study will be to test the performance of this molecular probe, which is injected in the patient two hours before surgery and imaged using a fluorescent camera supplied by On Target Laboratories. The image above shows the fluorescent camera in the surgery suite, and the image below shows the fluorescence image of the targeted agents accumulated at the cancerous lesions during the surgery.

Ovarian CancerView of localized region in peritoneal cavity of an ovarian cancer patient as seen with naked eye (left) or with the aid of a tumor-targeted fluorescence dye (right). This image is acquired with the fluorescent camera indicated with yellow arrow in the image above.



Learn More

 Optical Biology Core (OBC) 

Marsh Director: J. Lawrence Marsh, PhD
Phone:
949-824-6677
Facility Manager:
Adeela Syed
Phone:
949-824-3226
Location:
UC Irvine, 5302 Biological Sciences II, Irvine, CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/optical_biology_core.asp

The mission of the OBC is to provide researchers access to resources, including state of the art instrumentation and technical support, to conduct biomedical research.

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Quarterly Highlights

This quarter the Optical Biology Core (OBC) held an OBC oversight committee meeting to discuss new imaging techniques that would be of value to improve research at the OBC. Recently, a study was started to test the capability of a novel laser-based microscope to identify various skin conditions by capturing high-resolution skin images. The laser-based microscope, developed by JenLab, Inc. in Germany, is the only one of its kind in U.S. The instrument provides noninvasive “optical biopsies” by capturing images of human skin components (cells, collagen, elastin fibers). It is relatively quick (about 30 minutes) and painless. The OBC also recently installed a fluorescence lifetime-resolved imaging microscopy (FLIM) box on the LMS780. The FLIM box enables data collection for FLIM and fluctuation correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Among the many projects supported by the OBC, microbeam and microscopy technologies were shared with several cancer center members including:

1. Role of Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes in DNA repair, K.Yokomori (SPT)
2. Melanin Index (MeI), B. Tromberg (OIB), E. Gratton (OIB), and F. Meyskens (CPP)
3. Photochemical internalization (PCI) enhanced nonviral transfection of tumor suppressor genes; a potential treatment modality for gliomas, H. Hirschberg (AS)
4. Visualization of re-cellularizing a cardiac extracellular matrix, S. George (OIB)

The OBC also trained six new cancer center members on the two confocal microscopes housed at the facility and supports flow cytometry services.


Learn More

 Transgenic Mouse Facility (TMF) 

RandallDirector: Grant MacGregor, PhD
Phone:
949-824-8253
Facility Manager:
Tom Fielder
Phone:
949-824-6496

Location:
UC Irvine, Biological Sciences III, Rm. B138, Irvine, CA 92697
www.cancer.uci.edu/resources/transgenic_mouse_facility.asp

The Transgenic Mouse Facility (TMF) assists in the use of genetically modi­fied mice in biological and biomedical research. An important goal of the TMF is to identify new technology and methodology that is likely to benefi­t UC Irvine investigators using the mouse in their research programs and to import and provide such technology to UC Irvine investigators. The TMF makes investigators aware of new and existing developments via the TMF website, in seminars and lectures, via the UC Irvine MouseUsers email list and by word of mouth.

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Quarterly Highlights

The TMF performed mouse sperm cryopreservation for SPT cancer center members Anne Calof, Ken Cho, and Al Zlotnik. The TMF also assisted cancer center member Chris Hughes (OIB) with locating and obtaining frozen sperm from a Wnt5a conditional knockout model. Live mice were produced from frozen embryos for cancer center member, Dr. Anand Ganesan (SPT). In addition, the TMF rederived a strain of mice with multiple transgenes for new cancer center member Alex Boiko (SPT), allowing him to transfer his mice to UC Irvine. The TMF continued to beta-test a new method of performing DNA microinjections for Nanoinjection Technologies and also continued to make progress toward our goal of making more useful ES cell lines for reversible, inducible gene knockdown experiments. The TMF now has chimeric males made from the parental cells, and all of them have produced at least one litter.

University Lab Animal Resource (ULAR) recently completed negotiations with UCLA’s Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine to assign approved vendor status to the TMF. This means that when transgenic or gene-targeted mice are made by the TMF for UCLA clients, the mice can be transferred from the TMF directly to the client’s animal room without being rederived or going through quarantine. This arrangement will benefit many of UCLA's PIs, including members of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and will enhance the TMF’s position as a regional resource.

Learn More